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Measuring Health and Well-Being: We Need to Get it Right for Patients, With Patients

Published:November 14, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jval.2022.11.005
      We are writing regarding the April 2022 issue’s themed section on the EQ Health and Wellbeing (EQ-HWB) patient-reported outcome measure (PROM).
      • Norman R.
      • Olsen J.A.
      Expanding the scope of value for economic evaluation: the EQ-HWB.
      • Brazier J.
      • Peasgood T.
      • Mukuria C.
      • et al.
      The EQ Health and Wellbeing: overview of the development of a measure of health and wellbeing and key results.
      • Mukuria C.
      • Connell J.
      • Carlton J.
      • et al.
      Qualitative review on domains of quality of life important for patients, social care users, and informal carers to inform the development of the EQ-HWB.
      • Carlton J.
      • Peasgood T.
      • Mukuria C.
      • et al.
      Generation, selection, and face validation of items for a new generic measure of quality of life: the EQ-HWB.
      • Peasgood T.
      • Mukuria C.
      • Brazier J.
      • et al.
      Developing a new generic health and wellbeing measure: psychometric survey results for the EQ-HWB.
      • Monteiro A.L.
      • Kuharic M.
      • Pickard A.S.
      A comparison of a preliminary version of the EQ-HWB short and the 5-level version EQ-5D.
      • Augustovski F.
      • Argento F.
      • Rodríguez R.B.
      • Gibbons L.
      • Mukuria C.
      • Belizán M.
      The development of a new international generic measure (EQ-HWB): face validity and psychometric stages in Argentina.
      We agree with the authors, there is significant need to improve measures and methods for collecting health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and well-being data, and improve the incorporation of such data into patient-centered value and health technology assessment.
      • Brazier J.
      • Peasgood T.
      • Mukuria C.
      • et al.
      The EQ Health and Wellbeing: overview of the development of a measure of health and wellbeing and key results.
      We need new measures to overcome significant limitations of existing measures, especially regarding patient centricity and methodologically sound development. Nevertheless, we do not believe the EQ-HWB represents an improvement. We disagree with the development approaches taken and believe that among the many limitations we identified, the following 2 fatal flaws appear to render the EQ-HWB unusable: (1) there was insufficient patient engagement in the tool’s development, and consequently (2) it is unclear what the new tool measures.
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          It is healthy for this initiative—any initiative—to receive peer input and we appreciate the opportunity to reflect on the science and progress surrounding the EQ Health and Wellbeing (EQ-HWB).
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